As a member of the MySQL Community, you already know how important it is to have the ability to advocate the needs of users and to share feedback on how to keep growing the function and performance of the database. The IOUG is committed to supporting the MySQL community and maintaining the MySQL database, and we are pleased to announce the slate of candidates for the 2012 MySQL Council!

First Name
Last Name
Title
Company
Country
Alexandre
Almeida
CTO
HTI Tecnologia
Brazil
Sheeri
Cabral
DBA/Architect
Mozilla
United States
Laine
Campbell
Principal and CEO
PalominoDB
United States
Patrick
Galbraith
Senior Engineer Cloud Data Services
Hewlett Packard
United States
Bradley
Kuszmaul
Chief Architect
Tokutek
United States
Giuseppe
Maxia
Director of Quality Assurance
Continuent
Italy
Sarah
Novotny
CIO
Meteor Entertainment
United States
Marco
Tusa
Cluster Technical Leader
Pythian
Canada
Daniel
van Eeden
Consultant
Snow B.V.
Netherlands

Candidates wree able to self-nominate through an open call, and were reviewed by the current Council.

Anyone with questions or concerns regarding the 2012 Council candidates is invited to submit their comments by March 23. Comments can be submitted anonymously.

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As a member of the MySQL Community, you already know how important it is to have the ability to advocate the needs of users and to share feedback on how to keep growing the function and performance of the database. The IOUG is committed to supporting the MySQL community and maintaining the MySQL database, and we’d like your help. Submit yourself as a candidate for the 2012 MySQL Council! Visit mysql.ioug.org for more information

What is the role of the MySQL Council?

The MySQL Council will be composed of ideally 4-6 members representing a mix of the industries and businesses present within the community. The purpose of the Council is to provide feedback and recommendations to IOUG and Oracle on the best educational offerings, community-building and networking practices, and trending information for the MySQL community.

Additionally, the Council will be given the opportunity through IOUG to work with Oracle to provide a direct advocacy channel for user feedback, and to discuss the strategy for the MySQL database. The Council is not meant to replace the grassroots organizations that exist; in fact, this council is meant to help enhance communications.

Responsibilities

As a Council member, you would be asked to commit to participating in bi-monthly meetings, either by phone or face-to-face. We will also ask for your support in reaching out to the MySQL community members to promote speaking and volunteering opportunities. A Council term is one calendar year (Jan-Dec. 2012)

Participation Benefits

Council members in good standing will receive a complimentary one-year individual membership to IOUG, as well as the opportunity to receive discounted event registration for different opportunities throughout the year.

Please consider participating in the MySQL Council for 2012! Submissions should be received by January 16, 2012.

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Quick reminder: Free webcast on March 9 - Building A 2TB Highly Available MySQL Database with Danil Zburivsky

So this weekend the lovely Sheeri Cabral and Sarah Novotny recorded a podcast that explains what MySQL’ers would get out of attending COLLABORATE 11 (besides getting to go to the Harry Potter theme park for free, but that’s included, too.) One of the things I really liked was how they highlighted that COLLABORATE isn’t sales-y or run by Oracle – it’s run by users, and the MySQL sessions were picked out by MySQL users.  We’ve got open times for discussion and “ask the expert” options. We’ve got the MySQL Community Dinner East. Oh, and the ladies did provide a special registration rate.

Not to spoil the ending, but essentially the MySQL program at COLLABORATE is focused on operations,  so there’s lots of great tuning, storage, replication, etc etc etc, and maybe a little sandboxing. If you haven’t heard the podcast, make sure to listen in. It’s fun to listen to Sheeri do the math on how much education is really in a conference.

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Just as a reminder, don’t miss tomorrow’s free webinar.

February 16: COLLABORATE Sneak Preview: The Story of MySQL
Register today
10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. CT
Kaj Arnö, EVP Products, SkySQL Ab
MySQL (R) is a database owned by Oracle. But it’s a different creature. In a sneak preview of the upcoming COLLABORATE 11 session “MySQL, the Ecosystem, the Product: The Real Story for the IOUG”, MySQL veteran Kaj Arnö will describe the essentials of MySQL’s background and history, to the extent it’s relevant for today’s needs of an Oracle DBA/Developer. A lot of this webinar will be geared towards people new to MySQL, but it’s also a great way to look at how MySQL became what it is today.

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Because who doesn’t love free?

Upcoming free Webinars:

  • February 9: MySQL Cloud Scalability
    Register today
    11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. CT
    Sean Hull, Postabon, Inc.
    MySQL faces certain new challenges when moving to the cloud. In this Webinar, we’ll discuss best practices for deploying MySQL backed web applications in the cloud. We’ll place particular emphasis on scalability in the cloud, and baking the right sauce into your application design from the outset.
  • February 16: COLLABORATE Sneak Preview: The Story of MySQL
    Register today
    10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. CT
    Kaj Arnö, EVP Products, SkySQL Ab
    MySQL (R) is a database owned by Oracle. But it’s a different creature. In a sneak preview of the upcoming COLLABORATE 11 session “MySQL, the Ecosystem, the Product: The Real Story for the IOUG”, MySQL veteran Kaj Arnö will describe the essentials of MySQL’s background and history, to the extent it’s relevant for today’s needs of an Oracle DBA/Developer. A lot of this webinar will be geared towards people new to MySQL, but it’s also a great way to look at how MySQL became what it is today.
  • March 9: Building A 2TB Highly
    Register today
    11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. CT
    Danil Zburivsky, DBA & Team Lead, Pythian
    This Webinar will showcase a real-life example demonstrating how mature MySQL database software is and what an experienced DBA can expect from a large MySQL deployment. The project plan included setting up a highly available clustered infrastructure & disaster recovery site for MySQL and how the application was migrated to MySQL from a legacy database platform on OpenVMS. The session will also outline the business project overview and requirements, HA options with MySQL, architecture and implementation, disaster recovery and backup challenges.

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Last week someone sent me an article about the “dueling” MySQL conferences from IOUG and O’Reilly. On the one hand, I find it really entertaining that there’s a perception that, three years ago, when the Sun acquisition wasn’t even on the radar, we purposefully scheduled our conferences against each other in anticipation of this moment. If we had a crystal ball or the ability to see the future that well, I would have picked better lottery numbers three weeks ago.

The sad part is all the focus is placed on a hypothetical negative, and it overshadows the real point of the article – that a collection of MySQL community supporters are pooling their time and effort to make sure the community stays strong. I’m lucky enough to get to work with the MySQL Council, and so I know that working on anything related to MySQL is about collaboration. It’s about providing access. If the major problem facing a community is that they’re getting too much support, what a problem to have.

This kind of accessibility is the driving philosophy behind open source, so let’s not think of this as a duel; it’s about having choices. Look at the speakers, the locations, and the supporting offerings (to learn more about the different events, try the OurSQL podcast). If you’re confused, know that you have resources, like the Council volunteers. We have Council members presenting at both conferences, so I think you’ll get a straight answer.

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With speaker confirmations going out this week, the MySQL track at COLLABORATE 11 – IOUG Forum is filling up with the folks you expect to hear when you go to a MySQL event. Giuseppe Maxia will be playing in the MySQL sandbox, Matt Yonkovit will outline the 7 Deadly Performance Sins, and we’ll have Kaj Arno presenting a look at the MySQL ecosystem.  Oh, and Morgan Tocker. And Alexander Rubin. AND Bill Karwin. It’s like a real MySQL conference – oh wait, it IS a real MySQL conference! Of course, we owe a huge debt of gratitude to our Track Manager, Sheeri Cabral. (She’s presenting too, btw.)

If you haven’t considered COLLABORATE before, think of it as a way to get the best of all educational opportunities – real users and community heroes, combined with the Oracle technical staff who helped to bring you release 5.5.8. Plus, MySQL community members can use offer code “MYSQ” to get a special discounted rate ($1,175) for full week registration. It’s a great way to save on training dollars and come see what we’re all about.

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The Motley Fool had an interesting article yesterday about the OpenOffice spinoff, and what the impact to the open source community is starting to look like since the Oracle acquisition. While I’m not sure whether Anders has a crystal ball or is just consulting a magic 8 ball, I I’m sure it’s concerning to people to wonder what the support for MySQL will look like in the future.  I think there are some promising opportunities out there that might help relieve some of these anxieties.

The best resource the MySQL community has at its disposal is the same as it’s always been: fellow users. The ability to learn from the experience of other users and collaborate on how to make things better is the cornerstone of open source. This is true for customers running the Oracle stack as well. Oracle user groups have been around for about 20 years, and we are continuing to grow and work together. When users get together at COLLABORATE,  they’re going beyond the documentation and actually asking for help from people who do the same job they do, who can talk specifically about what they’ve customized and where they would do things differently, and where they can talk about what they’d like to see. Another great thing about a user group meeting is that this feedback during receptions and after sessions isn’t just building castles in the air.

While we may not always agree, the partnership between Oracle and the user groups allow members to combine their voices and carry enough weight to be heard. At every event, we meet with executives, product managers and all levels of the Oracle structure to let them know what we’re thinking, and some Oracle teams specifically bring staff just to get to meet face-to-face with customers and talk. One of the things that IOUG as a group wants to do for 2010-11 is find ways to help get these same opportunities for the MySQL community (and speakers! We want speakers!).

By having a structured community, users never lose knowledge when individuals within the community shift their role. They alway have a place to get questions answered, and they always know that they are among friends and peers who can absolutely relate. A lot of current Oracle community members come to Oracle through acquisitions; while it’s never easy to be the small fish in a big pond, user communities are kind of like a school of fish. By acting together, we are more noticeable, generate more force and can compete with the big fish.

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The Independent Oracle Users Group, a dolphin-friendly database community, is offering four days of sessions dedicated to MySQL at COLLABORATE 11, and we want you to present! Bring your brainpower to the premier, user-driven MySQL event of 2011 - submit your abstract today. The deadline has been specially extended for MySQL speakers until October 11, but don’t wait to submit – get your session entered today! Learn more at http://collaborate11.ioug.org/mysql.

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Please join us on Tuesday, Sept. 28 for an afternoon of networking and educational opportunities as the IOUG hosts Matt Yonkovit, MySQL expert, for his presentation “MySQL: What You May or May Not Know.”

Tuesday, September 28 | 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Agenda:

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
The 5 Minute DBA: A Crash Course to MySQL DBA Troubleshooting and Optimizations

Many people who are charged with running MySQL are not DBAs, rather they are developers, system administrators, network administrators, etc. Typically these people put on a DBA hat only when there is a problem to solve or to deal directly with. These people are called “the 5 minute DBAs,” dealing with databases issues for only a very short time in any given week. This session will give these 5 minute warriors some basic tools and skills in order to maximize the time they spend in MySQL.

Who Should Attend:
• Oracle or SQL Server DBAs who have little knowledge of MySQL
• Developers who are charged with managing MySQL
• System administrators who are responsible for running MySQL on one of their boxes
• Anyone who is not a full-time DBA but runs MySQL

2:10 p.m. – 3:10 p.m.
The MySQL Sandtraps: The Top Developer and DBA Mistakes Seen Over and Over Again at Client Sites

Our speaker has worked with hundreds of MySQL customers over the past four years, and many of them actually fall into the same bad habits. Whether it’s over-allocating memory or using GUIDs for primary keys, the results end up being the same…non-optimal database performance. Learn the most common of these mistakes, why they are bad and how you can avoid them.

Who Should Attend:
• Oracle or SQL Server DBAs who have little knowledge of MySQL
• Developers who are charged with managing MySQL
• System administrators who are responsible for running MySQL on one of their boxes
• Anyone who is not a full-time DBA but runs MySQL

3:20 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
MySQL Scalability and High Availability: Options for Scaling and Hardening Your MySQL Database Environment

How does one achieve high availability in MySQL? What happens when you max out a single server, how do you scale MySQL for performance? There are many different tools, technologies, and tricks out there that can help DBAs and system administrators achieve their HA and Scalability goals. Learn about Sharding, Replication, DRBD, Read-Write Splitting, MySQL Proxy and more.

Who Should Attend:
• DBAs
• System administrators
• Architects
• Managers

4:10 p.m. – 4:40 p.m.
OpenSource Projects and Releases You Need to be Aware Of

What tools are available to help you manage your environment? What’s the deal with all these storage engines? What’s a MySQL fork? And why should you pay attention to all these things?
Learn about the tools the speaker uses on a daily basis, paying special attention to the various versions of MySQL out on the market today (MySQL, MariaDB, Drizzle, Percona Server, etc).

Who Should Attend:
• DBA
• Decision makers

Snacks and beverages will be provided.
You must register to attend this event.

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